Owanto, Flowers IV from La Jeune Fille à la Fleur, 2015. Cold porcelain flower on aluminium UV print, 186 x 125 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

The Forgotten Drawer

Celebrating Womanhood

French after English.

My name is Owanto, and I am an artist from Gabon. I have had the honour of representing Gabon in their first-ever national pavilion, which was a part of the International Art Exhibition at the 53rd Venice Biennale in 2009. This solo exhibition was curated by Fernando Francés, and I was the first artist from sub-Saharan Africa to have a solo exhibition in a national pavilion at the Venice Biennale.

 

Owanto, Flowers III from La Jeune Fille à la Fleur, 2015. Cold porcelain flower on aluminium UV print, 89 x 125cm. Courtesy of the artist.Owanto, Flowers III from La Jeune Fille à la Fleur, 2015. Cold porcelain flower on aluminium UV print, 89 x 125cm. Courtesy of the artist.

 

ART AFRICA: In the art world, you go only by the name Owanto – could you perhaps explain both the significance of this and its meaning?

Owanto: My mother was named ‘Owanto Bia’ by my grandmother, which means beautiful woman in Omyéné – one of the languages spoken in Libreville, Gabon. I borrowed my mother’s name as a way of honouring her, and the other heroines who raised me, but I kept it shorter since Owanto, meaning woman, seemed to be powerful enough.

I believe ‘Owanto’ is fitting, considering that I have made it my role to highlight, to embrace in my heart, women’s issues. This is evident in my Flowers Series, in which I call for girls and women to reclaim their power. Owanto is my identity as an artist, and I believe in the raw material of love, where mothers, daughters and sisters play their part and become agents of change.

I borrowed my mother’s name

as a way of honouring her, and the other heroines who raised me,

but I kept it shorter since Owanto, meaning woman,

seemed to be powerful enough.

In 2009, you exhibited at the Republic of Gabon’s inaugural pavilion at the 53rd Venice Biennale. Could you tell us a bit more about your exhibition, ‘The Lighthouse of Memory’, ‘Go Nogé Mènè’, as well as how your work has progressed, or developed, since then?

‘Go Nogé Mènè’ means building the future. It was a great honour to represent my country, Gabon, at the 53rd Venice Biennale in 2009. It was an incredible privilege to be on a multicultural platform that allowed global discussion to stimulate progress and question ways to build the future. Within this context, I looked to the past and compiled a projection of memories starting from the 1960s. I remembered and re-imagined being in Libreville where, as a child, I could feel my parents’ heartbeat and the euphoria surrounding Gabon’s Independence.

Photographs capturing the past confronted photographs of the present – hopefully to help shape the future. At the same time, I found myself asking about where we are going? I felt that this was the main question the world was asking, particularly around 2008 and 2009 following the global financial crash. Closer to home, Gabon had just lost El Hadj Omar Bongo – the father of the nation – who had run the country for 42 years. For me, ‘where are we going?’ is mostly a metaphysical question that concerns every one of us as human beings looking for direction and goals. In light of this, building the future was my only answer. The installation of a tree house displayed in the courtyard of a 16th-century palazzo was a metaphor for home, a laboratory for love, a place to build good things. Inside the tree house was a projection of the past and the present. The spaces inside had beds, my children’s belongings and painted graffiti on the walls. My children had left their own traces.

After my solo show at the Venice Biennale, I became even more committed to socio-political issues. I believed  – rightly or wrongly – in a sense of mission to create change through contemporary art. To do this, I had to believe in visual poetry. Art as a tool; art as a weapon for change. Neon lights and words. Photographs and sculptures. Found objects. Films and audio material. All of these would be usable to create statements.

 

Owanto, I love you, do you love me?, 2015. Installation [bed, neon and slideshow projecting onto pillow] and Photography, dimensions variable. Owanto, I love you, do you love me?, 2015. Installation [bed, neon and slideshow projecting onto pillow] and Photography, dimensions variable.

 

Your artwork, La Jeune Fille à la Fleur (Flowers II), confronts female genital mutilation (FGM) and the global affect this still has on women today. Can you tell us more about how you came to create this body of work, and the significance of it being part of the permanent collection at Zeitz MOCAA – the largest museum for contemporary African art on the continent?

I first discovered little celluloid photographs of young women undergoing female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) in a family album which had been handed down to me. My first reaction was to quickly put them back in le tiroir de l’oubli – something I call ‘the forgotten drawer’ – as I didn’t want to be upset, and I didn’t want to process the pain that I saw in those photographs – even though I could also understand that some of these images portrayed celebration. On the surface, these photographs simply captured a circumcision ceremony and they did not speak of mutilation. There is, indeed, the aspect of celebrating both the coming-of-age of young girls and tradition, but the side that I saw was mostly the pain. As a result, I decided to forget about the photographs.

Three days later, I came back to them because I could not forget.

 

Owanto, Let them dream their own dreams (Installation view at La Biennale di Venezia), 2001. Wood, straw and mixed media, 618 × 393 × 380cm. Images courtesy of the artist.Owanto, Let them dream their own dreams (Installation view at La Biennale di Venezia), 2001. Wood, straw and mixed media, 618 × 393 × 380cm. Images courtesy of the artist.

 

I decided then to completely go the other way. I decided to bring the matters that haunted me most about these ceremonies to life and to enlarge those tiny photographs up to three metres high. The medium I chose was aluminum – the photographs would be printed on metal – to create a kind of a contemporary feel, because FGM/C is a very contemporary subject.

Once enlarged, I thought it very interesting to create a hole in the part of the girl where the injury took place, the part of the mutilation. I filled that void with a flower made by hand, petal by petal, to bring a floral sensuality back to the girl. The flower is actually made with corn and glue, corn being an organic material. That flower would then create a change of narrative for the girl. Instead of a void, it would symbolise unity, hope and the blossoming of womanhood.

It was very important to me to have La Jeune Fille à la Fleur included in the Zeitz MOCAA permanent collection so that it could be seen by a greater number of people. Hopefully, this will allow the conversation to go further so that we can make the world a better place for women and girls. The significance of it being a part of the permanent collection at Zeitz MOCAA – the largest major museum for contemporary African art on the continent – is that it confirms to me that what I am doing is important. It allows the artwork to speak for itself, and for it to be a means of empowering women and girls. Mark Coetzee, the director of Zeitz MOCAA, said that the museum is meant to be a safe place for bringing up challenging social and political issues. Those words resonated with me.

 

Owanto, Flowers II from La Jeune Fille à la Fleur, 2017. Cold porcelain flower on aluminum UV print, 200 x 288cm. Permanent Collection of the Zeitz MOCAA. Courtesy of the artist.Owanto, Flowers II from La Jeune Fille à la Fleur, 2017. Cold porcelain flower on aluminum UV print, 200 x 288cm. Permanent Collection of the Zeitz MOCAA. Courtesy of the artist.

 

La Jeune Fille à la Fleur being seen in such an important institution validates the work and what it stands for. It allows me, the artist, to have a stronger voice. At once it brings the conversation within the sphere of contemporary art, and into the sphere of education and culture.

We are living in a historical moment. I believe Zeitz MOCAA will be a game – changer for the continent. It is an ambitious model, which I hope will be followed by other players on the continent. The museum will allow artists of the continent to express their voices in their own continent. It is a huge moment, and it is opening doors and new possibilities that matter.

Could you tell us about any current projects that you’re working on?

I am currently working on a project titled One Thousand Voices, which aims to give a voice to voiceless women. My daughter Katya and I – we are partners, she’s a journalist – are aiming to interview 1 000 survivors of FGM/C. This particular project started a year ago when I began to interview people from the South Asian community in New York City. Now we are receiving voices via the Internet. People are sending their experiences through WhatsApp, and voices are coming to us from all over the world. We have recently received voices from Singapore, Bahrain, the United States, Tanzania and Kenya. These women’s voices are going to overlap and be united as one voice.

 

We are living in a historical moment.

I believe Zeitz MOCAA will be a game-changer

for the continent.

 

One Thousand Voices signifies a bridge between the visual images of the past (my original photographs date back to probably around 1940) that I have rescued and digitalised, and these sound images – the One Thousand Voices of recorded testimony – of contemporary society. Together they create a link between the past and the present, and question where we’re headed globally in terms of women’s rights over their own bodies.

With regard to urgency and relevance, we are talking about 200 million survivors of FGM/C today, and we are talking about three million young women who are at risk each year. So that’s really my commitment, and I’m feeling quite emotional about having the possibility to speak about it.

Where on the global stage can we expect to see your artwork in the near future?

I started the Flowers Series three years ago and other works from the same series was shown by the Voice Gallery in October 2017 at the 1:54 Contemporary Art Fair in London, and in November 2017 at AKAA Art and Design Fair in Paris. I also had a solo show curated by Azubuike Nwagbogu during LagosPhoto this November, 2017.

 

 

FRENCH

 

Je m’appelle Owanto et je suis une artiste du Gabon. J’ai eu l’honneur de représenter le Gabon à la 53e exposition internationale d’art contemporain de la Biennale de Venise en 2009. J’ai été exposée dans le tout premier pavillon national du pays. J’étais ainsi la première artiste d’Afrique sub-saharienne à avoir une exposition personnelle dans un pavillon national de la Biennale de Venise, exposition dont Fernando Francés fut le commissaire.

 

Owanto, Flowers III from La Jeune Fille à la Fleur, 2015. Cold porcelain flower on aluminium UV print, 89 x 125cm. Courtesy of the artist.Owanto, Flowers III from La Jeune Fille à la Fleur, 2015. Cold porcelain flower on aluminium UV print, 89 x 125cm. Courtesy of the artist.

 

ART AFRICA: Vous êtes reconnue exclusivement sous le nom d’ « Owanto » dans le monde de l’art. Pourriez-vous nous expliquer quelle est l’importance et quel est le sens de ce choix pour vous?

Owanto: Ma grand-mère a choisi d’appeler ma mère « Owanto Bia », ce qui signifie « w » en Omyéné, l’une des langues parlées à Libreville au Gabon. J’ai emprunté le nom de ma mère pour l’honorer, ainsi que toutes les femmes héroïques qui m’ont élevées, et j’ai réduit ce nom car « Owanto », c’est-à-dire « femme », m’a semblé suffisamment fort.

Je crois que le nom « Owanto » correspond au rôle que je me suis donné, celui d’embrasser de tout cœur la cause des femmes. Cela semble évident dans ma série Flowers, où j’appelle les jeunes filles et les femmes à revendiquer de nouveau leur autorité et leur force. Owanto est mon identité d’artiste, et je crois à l’amour pur où mères, filles et sœurs jouent leur rôle en tant qu’actrices du changement.

 

Owanto, I love you, do you love me?, 2015. Installation [bed, neon and slideshow projecting onto pillow] and Photography, dimensions variable. Owanto, I love you, do you love me?, 2015. Installation [bed, neon and slideshow projecting onto pillow] and Photography, dimensions variable.

 

En 2009, vous avez exposé au pavillon inaugural de la République du Gabon à la 53e Biennale de Venise. Pourriez-vous nous en dire plus à propos de votre exposition « Le Phare de la Mémoire, Go Nogé Mènè », ainsi que sur la manière dont votre travail a progressé et s’est développé depuis ?

« Go Nogé Mènè » signifie construire l’avenir. C’était un grand honneur de représenter mon pays, le Gabon, à la 53e Biennale de Venise en 2009. C’était un privilège incroyable de prendre part à cette plateforme multiculturelle qui encourage le progrès et envisage différentes manières de construire le futur, grâce à un dialogue international. Dans ce contexte, je me suis tournée vers le passé et j’ai rassemblé un ensemble de souvenirs réunis depuis les années 1960. Je me suis rappelé et j’ai réimaginé Libreville lorsque j’étais enfant, lorsque je pouvais sentir battre le cœur de mes parents dans l’euphorie de l’indépendance du Gabon.

Des photographies s’emparant du passé étaient confrontées à des photographies du présent, dans l’espoir de façonner le futur. En même temps, je me suis retrouvée à me demander dans quelle direction nous allions. J’ai ressenti cette question comme essentielle, en particulier en 2008 et 2009, après la crise financière internationale. Plus près de chez moi, le Gabon venait juste de perdre El Hadj Omar Bongo, le père de la nation, qui a dirigé le pays pendant 42 ans. Pour moi, la question « Où allons-nous ? » était surtout d’ordre métaphysique. C’est une interrogation qui nous touche tous en tant qu’être humain en quête d’objectifs et de directions. À la lumière de cela, construire l’avenir était ma seule réponse. L’installation d’une cabane réalisée dans un arbre et présentée dans la cour d’un palais datant du XVIe siècle était une métaphore du foyer, un laboratoire de l’amour, un endroit pour inventer de belles choses. A l’intérieur, la cabane était à la fois une projection du passé et du présent. Les espaces intérieurs avaient des lits, les affaires de mes enfants y étaient disposées et des graffitis ornaient les murs. Mes enfants avaient véritablement laissé leurs propres traces.

 

Owanto, Let them dream their own dreams (Installation view at La Biennale di Venezia), 2001. Wood, straw and mixed media, 618 × 393 × 380cm. Images courtesy of the artist.Owanto, Let them dream their own dreams (Installation view at La Biennale di Venezia), 2001. Wood, straw and mixed media, 618 × 393 × 380cm. Images courtesy of the artist.

 

Après mon exposition à la Biennale de Venise, mon intérêt pour les questions socio-économiques s’est accru. J’ai cru, à tort ou à raison, être investie d’une forme de mission, celle de susciter le changement à travers l’art contemporain. Afin d’accomplir cette mission, j’ai été obligée de croire à la poésie visuelle, à l’art comme outil, comme arme pour le changement. Des néons et des mots. Des objets trouvés. Des films et des enregistrements audio. Tout cela pouvait désormais être utilisé pour affirmer mes revendications.

Votre œuvre d’art « La Jeune Fille à la Fleur » s’attaque aux mutilations génitales féminines (MGF) et à la manière dont elles affectent encore les femmes aujourd’hui dans le monde. Pouvez-vous nous en dire plus sur ce qui vous a amené à créer cette œuvre et sur son importance, du fait de sa présence dans la collection permanente du Zeitz MOCAA, le premier musée d’art contemporain africain sur le continent?

C’est dans un album familial qui m’a été remis que j’ai découvert pour la première fois des photos de jeunes femmes ayant subi des mutilations génitales. Ma première réaction a été de les ranger rapidement dans le « tiroir de l’oubli », car je ne voulais pas être contrariée, je ne voulais pas endurer la souffrance ressentie dans ces photographies, même si je comprenais aussi qu’elles étaient les images d’une célébration. De l’extérieur, ces photographies capturaient simplement l’instant d’une cérémonie célébrant une circoncision et n’exprimaient pas la mutilation. Il y a en effet l’idée de fêter le passage à la maturité de ces jeunes filles ainsi que la tradition, mais le côté que j’en ai vu était seulement celui de la souffrance. Finalement, j’ai décidé d’oublier ces photographies.

 

Owanto, Flowers II from La Jeune Fille à la Fleur, 2017. Cold porcelain flower on aluminum UV print, 200 x 288cm. Permanent Collection of the Zeitz MOCAA. Courtesy of the artist.Owanto, Flowers II from La Jeune Fille à la Fleur, 2017. Cold porcelain flower on aluminum UV print, 200 x 288cm. Permanent Collection of the Zeitz MOCAA. Courtesy of the artist.

 

Trois jours plus tard, j’y suis revenue car je ne pouvais pas les oublier.

J’ai alors décidé de m’y prendre d’une toute autre manière. J’ai entrepris de donner vie aux questions qui me tourmentaient le plus à propos de ces cérémonies, en brûlant les fines et petites photographies jusqu’à trois mètres de hauteur. Je me suis servie de l’aluminium : les photographies seraient en effet imprimées sur des supports en métal, afin de créer une sensation de contemporanéité, car les mutilations/coupures génitales féminines (MGF/C) sont des sujets d’une grande actualité.

Une fois brûlées, j’ai trouvé intéressant de créer un trou sur les photographies à l’endroit de la blessure. J’ai pensé remplir ce vide avec une fleur faite à la main, pétale après pétale, pour redonner aux jeunes filles une sensualité florale. La fleur a été réalisée avec du maïs et de la glue, des matériaux organiques. Cette fleur avait alors le pouvoir de changer le discours porté sur la jeune fille. A la place d’un vide, la photographie symboliserait l’unité, l’espoir, l’éclosion de l’humanité.

C’était important pour moi de voir « La Jeune Fille à la Fleur » sélectionnée pour faire partie de la collection permanente du Zeitz MOCAA et ainsi être vue par beaucoup plus de personnes, en espérant que cela permette d’élargir le débat et que le monde devienne meilleur pour les femmes. Le fait que cette œuvre soit intégrée au sein de la collection permanente du Zeitz MOCAA, le premier musée majeur pour l’art contemporain africain sur le continent, est une façon de confirmer l’importance de ce que je crée. Cela permet à l’œuvre d’art de parler d’elle-même, et de rendre aux femmes leur indépendance et leur autonomie. Mark Coetzee, directeur du Zeitz MOCAA, a affirmé que le musée avait pour vocation d’être un espace pacifié où toutes les revendications politiques et sociales pouvaient être exprimées. Ces mots ont pour moi fait sens.  Le fait que « La jeune fille à la fleur » puisse désormais être vue dans une telle institution prouve la justesse de l’œuvre, et ce pour quoi elle a été créée. Cela me permet, en tant qu’artiste, de porter ma voix plus loin. En même temps, cela amène le débat au centre du monde de l’art contemporain ainsi que dans les sphères de l’éducation et de la culture.

 

Owanto, Flowers VI from La Jeune Fille à la Fleur, 2015. Cold porcelain flower on aluminum UV print, 125 x 89cm. Courtesy of the artist.Owanto, Flowers VI from La Jeune Fille à la Fleur, 2015. Cold porcelain flower on aluminum UV print, 125 x 89cm. Courtesy of the artist.

 

Nous sommes en train de vivre un moment historique. Je crois que le Zeitz MOCAA va apporter un changement considérable sur le continent, c’est un modèle ambitieux qui j’espère sera suivi. Le musée permettra aux artistes du continent de s’exprimer sur leur propre territoire. C’est un grand moment, et ce sont ces nouvelles portes et possibilités qui comptent.

Pouvez-vous nous parler des projets sur lesquels vous travaillez en ce moment ?

Je suis actuellement en train de travailler sur un projet intitulé « Mille voix », qui a pour objectif de donner une voix aux femmes qui n’en n’ont pas. Ma fille Katya et moi (nous sommes partenaires, elle est journaliste) voulons interroger « 1000 voix », survivantes des mutilations/coupures génitales féminines. Ce projet a débuté il y a un an lorsque j’ai commencé à interroger des personnes de la communauté sud-asiatique à New York. Maintenant, nous recevons des « voix » grâce à internet. De nombreuses personnes partagent leur expérience avec WhatsApp, et des témoignages viennent à nous, de partout dans le monde. Nous avons récemment reçu des voix de Singapour, du Bahrein, des Etats-Unis, de Tanzanie, et du Kenya. Ces paroles de femmes seront ensuite réunies en une seule voix.

« Mille voix » représente un pont entre des images visuelles du passé (mes photographies originales datent d’environ 1940) qui ont été conservées et numérisées, et des images sonores de la société contemporaine, les « Mille voix » de témoignages enregistrés. Ensemble ces images créent un lien entre le passé et le présent, et posent la question de la direction que prend le savoir en ce qui concerne le droit des femmes sur leurs corps.

Nous parlons d’environ 200 millions de femmes survivantes de mutilations/coupures génitales, et d’environ trois millions de jeunes femmes qui sont chaque année en situation de risque. C’est  donc un réel engagement, et je suis assez émue d’avoir la possibilité d’en parler.

Où pouvons-nous espérer trouver vos œuvres sur la scène internationale dans un futur proche ?

J’ai débuté ma série « Flowers » il y a trois ans et elle sera exposée, avec d’autres œuvres, pendant la foire 1:54 à Londres en octobre grâce à Voice Gallery qui me représente, ainsi qu’en novembre pendant la Foire d’art et de design AKAA à Paris. J’aurai également une exposition personnelle pendant le festival Lagos Photo en novembre, dont Azubuike Nwagbogu sera le commissaire.

 

FEATURED IMAGE:  Owanto, Flowers IV from La Jeune Fille à la Fleur, 2015. Cold porcelain flower on aluminium UV print, 186 x 125 cm. Courtesy of the artist.